Lindiwe Priscilla Krasin: An Idealogy of the Flesh, Art History, and the Middle East

Lindiwe KrasinMy name is Lindiwe Priscilla Krasin.  I am in the Individualized MA program.  I am a woman of color. I am an ex-sexworker and I belong ideologically to the revolutionary left.  I was born in Gaborone, Botswana in 1976 into a mixed race household.  I was educated in the Sudan, Kenya, Lesotho and the United States.  I have two children at home who may be seen on campus running around with their big afros during residency.  The three of us are Team Krasin.  I also have a son who lives in Massachusetts with his papa.  He is a man now.  His name is Mujaheed which means holy warrior in Arabic.  He was born after my first year of college.  I have been a mother for a long time.  That is why I came to Goddard, because I can be a mom and still go to school.  Now that I have done Goddard I really wish that my son would apply to the BA program.  It would change his life and give him wings.  Wings?  Yes, that is correct.  I said WINGS.  Goddard is a place where human beings build them, sometimes from scratch if need be.

My academic discoveries at Goddard have been beyond fun.  Ecstatic is a better word.  Learning at Goddard has been an amazing experience.  GODDARD IS FREEDOM.  You can study whatever you want.  If all you care about is 16th century Italian shoes they will help you to find a way to specialize in just that, adding other stuff in along the way as is appropriate for attaining a college degree. I did my first semester on the art history of the modern and contemporary Middle East.  I covered the history of art in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Sudan, Palestine, Yemen, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon and a little bit on Saudi Arabia, namely learning about public art in Jeddah. In my second semester I studied human rights and Palestinian art.   I studied depictions of prostitutes, GLTBQ and nudes in modern and contemporary Middle Eastern art.  As I result I also had to study gender and sexual constructs from the region and Arab modernist theories/treatments of sex and sexuality.  I am doing my thesis on the concepts of the center and the margins in relation to depictions of prostitutes, GLTBQ and nudes in modern and contemporary Middle Eastern art.

While at Goddard I have developed what I call An Ideology of the Flesh.  I have taken all of my life knowledge and studies and applied them to both life itself and aesthetics.  My Ideology of the Flesh posits the sexual aesthetic as being one of the most important life giving things a person can do to keep their everyday life full of both adventure and joy.  I see sex appeal/the sex appeal aesthetic as something that is capable of healing a person and society.  I believe that people who are sexy on purpose by ideology and action–like myself—improve the world and channel the energy of all creation into the human body/soul recreating the very big-bang of the universe creating itself in the self every single day.  I really believe this stuff.  I live by it, I teach it when asked and it is what I plan on standing by until that day that I leave this earth.

So, what is the Goddard work/paradigm useful for in life?  The answer is EVERYTHING, everything, every single thing.  Goddard does not just educate students, it changes lives.  I used the holistic Goddard philosophy of creating a degree that incorporates who each of us is and what we study to create a business that is a direct offshoot of my life, my studies and my passions. My business is called Sex & Safari.  I use the sex appeal aesthetic to sell art, culture, style, human rights and nature conservation.  Sex & Safari’s first event is a public photograph exhibit called The Sexiest Women in Maine in Biddeford in January 2015.  You can learn more about it at www.sexandsafari.com.

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This entry was posted in Activism, Embodiment Studies & Body Image, Sexuality & Erotic Studies, Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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